Thursday, January 19, 2017

Korean patchwork bojagi - tutorial


When Marian from Seamstobesew asked me to participate in her blog hop "A Fresh Snow Hop"and show sewing with non cotton fabrics I was absolutely sure what to share with you .
This is totally different from traditional quilt - first because of fabrics and second - because of specific way of constructing the finished item.

Have you ever heard about pojagi - the Korean patchwork?
It is also known as bojagi.
When I have seen a curtain made this technique I felt in love.
I have sewn a similar curtain six years ago. The fabrics I used then was not transparent, but there is a lamp behind the curtain so the effect was the same.
Now I tried sewing pojagi with different fabrics and I am  satisfied with the result too much.



All you need is transparent fabrics. As a real quilter you have to have a lot of patience.

You might read some tutorials after Google searching or read my step by step detailed instructions.

Here is the fabric. It is fine linen specially for curtain. The good news is that both sides are the same.


Get two pieces. You have to stitch them by "french seam" - no face, no backside for the finished item.


 Before stitching them see how to place proper- with a little gap - about 1/3 inch.


In traditional piecing if you work with 1/4 inch seam allowances you need 1/2 inch extra fabric when stitch together two pieces.

It is good to know that here you must provide ONE INCH extra fabric - 1/3 inch from first fabric and 2/3 inch from second fabric.

After stitching iron as shown. First towards one side and then to make an auxiliary fold on the back.











 Now the next stitching is very easy.

 Finished look of this stage,

Keep in mind that now both side are different - one seam on the first and two seams on another.
Use different threads if want to increase the effect.
Here we don't have a quilting so contrasting thread is quite welcome.
Be brave to experiment.















 Repeat the same way with other pieces no matter the size and color. Trim the exceed if needed.




Good luck!


Don't forget to visit future participants, here is the schedule:

Jan 20
Jan 23
Jan 24
Jan 25

49 comments:

  1. OOOOh, that's wonderful, and what a great technique... When I've stitched French seams in the past, I like using a twin needle with both threads, it creates a little bit of texture their on the edges, but they are also fun using decorative stitches to.. The only difficult thing I find with french seams is keeping that fabric tucked under, but other than that, they are pretty easy.

    I love the pattern and so much fun.. I'd definitely like to try it.

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    1. Thanks for inviting me in the bloghop. It was a pleasure to share such ephemeral curtain during winter time. Waiting for sunny days :)

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  2. I had looked into this a few years ago. It reminded me a bit of sewing French seams on clothing. Your hanging is lovely. Perhaps I should try it.

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  3. Very pretty. I haven't seen this before.

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  4. What a lovely quilt. Thank you for sharing your tips on how to make this using French seams...something I have not done since my high school sewing class!

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  5. How beautiful! I have never heard of this technique so thank you for sharing. It comes out very organic looking and it would seem nice you do a few of the seams it probably goes quickly.

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  6. Beautiful work! It has been a long time since I made French seams, thanks for the great post!

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  7. wow this is lovely. thanks for sharing the tips. I will need to try this.

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  8. Very interesting, and beautiful. Thanks for sharing the technique with us! I love seeing things that are new. (to me anyway) ;-)

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  9. I have seen these before but didn't know what it was called. Thanks for sharing.

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  10. It is always good to learn something new--
    thanks for sharing--and your curtain is lovely-
    enjoy the moment-di

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  11. Those are very beautiful and elegant! I can easily picture them on all the windows blowing in a summer breeze. Definately putting them on my to-do list! Thank you for sharing.

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  12. Nice technique, and I really like the curtain. Thanks for sharing.

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  13. I like this Technique very Nice. I want to try this

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  14. Very cool, I'll have to try this! Thanks so much.

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  15. Beautiful. Thank you for sharing.

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  16. I like this, it's very nice and totally new to me.

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  17. Very interesting! I can think of several places where this would look quite dramatic. Thank you!

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  18. Interesting technique - have not seen it before!!! mumbird3(at)gmail(dot)com

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  19. What I unique and new to me technique--I love how it looks! Thank you for sharing!

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  20. Very different-and very nice! Love thr transparent fabric-great idea! Thank you, Susan

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  21. Very interesting. I would like to try it.

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  22. What a lovely curtain. Thank you for sharing the wonderful inspiration. raydeer@memlane.com

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  23. Thanks for sharing. I had never heard of Korean patchwork before.

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  24. Thanks for sharing your project! It's an interesting technique.

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  25. This is a new to me technique and very interesting. Thanks for sharing.

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  26. That is very interesting! It would look lovely on some of my windows. Thanks for the tutorial.

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  27. I love this. Thanks for the tutorial.

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  28. That is a great look! I very much like the one hanging in the window, too. Thank you for sharing how to do it.

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  29. What an amazing project, I love how you did that & thanks for the tutorial. I want to try thie technique.

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  30. This reminds me of a stained glass window. This technique is new to me, so I learned something today.

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  31. Cool!, French seams, wow. Think I'll stick with the glass!

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  32. So beautiful! Thanks so much for sharing your technique and project with us.

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  33. Interesting technique. thanks for sharing

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  34. Pretty interesting. I have never seen this technique before. So simple to create something so stunning. Thanks for being a stop on the hop!

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  35. That's so nice! It reminds me of stained glass.

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  36. This is gorgeous, very interesting!

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  37. Wonderful window dressing. Thank you for introducing me to Korean patchwork and the how-tos ... :) Pat

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  38. Definitely looks like stained glass!
    I do enjoy making French seams--I got pretty darn good at them while making my wedding dress, with all the layers of slippery charmeuse and fine, slippery chiffon. Another good way to practice French seams is making pillowcases--cotton is more forgiving and easier to work with. Plus, the French seams definitely make s pillowcase sturdier and less likely to ravel the seams.
    Thanks for introducing us to a different cultural quilting-type Art!
    reillyr2(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  39. Very interesting! I agree that it appears as stained glass. quiltlovefordomesticfelicity(at)gmail(dot)com

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  40. Thank yo so much to all of you!

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